Videos: Sustainable and integrated pest management practices for nurseries

IPM videos
Sustainable nursery and IPM practices videos are now available online!

University of Georgia and University of Florida have partnered to produce a series of short videos to help nursery producers to better understand and to more effectively use sustainable practices.

You can find the list of videos and view them here.

For more information on this project visit this site.

One of the latest videos covers Integrated Pest Management (IPM). The video includes an overview of IPM including sanitation, irrigation and sustainable pest management. See the IPM video here.

Other topics are listed below. Visit the home site to view these videos.

  • General Sustainability / Introduction
  • Container Production
  • Energy Efficiency
  • Fertilization
  • General Irrigation
  • General Production
  • Integrated Pest Management (IPM)
  • Runoff Management & Reclaimed Water Use
  • Recycling and Re-purposing
  • Substrates

Information taken from the Southeast Ornamental Horticulture Production and IPM blog.

Apps help identify invasive pests

Clint Thompson, news editor with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

http://apps.bugwood.org/apps.html

Is there an unwanted invasive insect or plant on your farm or in your garden that you don’t recognize? The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences has an app for that.

Invasive species trackers at the UGA Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health have developed a suite of apps to help farmers, forestry personnel and home gardeners identify strange unwanted invasive pests. They can now identify their problem invasive pests in the field, rather than breaking away to sit down at a computer and look it up.

Apps developed by the center’s technology director Chuck Bargeron and his co-workers provide direct links to different databases specializing in informing and educating the public about invasive species, those not native to an area that has been introduced and causing damage to agriculture and forestry. Such species include the kudzu bug that munches on soybeans and the spotted wing drosophila which affects blueberry crops.

“For the IOS platform, we’ve had more than 25,000 downloads of apps. The most successful one was the first one we did which was for Florida, which was focused primarily on pythons in south Florida. It’s probably been the most successful because it had the most press coverage when it first came out,” Bargeron said.

The app is one of 17 the center has developed. It provides different apps for different parts of the country because, for example, farmers in the Western United States aren’t concerned with the same species that growers in the Southeast are concerned with. Working a regional perspective allows users to focus on species in their geographic area.

Bargeron and members of the Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health have had great success with database web-based resources of information, especially after the pictures image archive were added to the website in 2001. When Keith Douce and David Moorhead, — co-directors of the center formally known as Bugwood Network, — launched the website in 2001 they added pictures from 35mm slides. Approximately 3,500 pictures were available. As more and more people began using the website and recognizing its value, they started sharing their own pictures. The database of pictures increased greatly in the 12 years since the website was started. Now, more than 200,000 pictures from more than 2,000 photographers are in the systems database.

These resources have also changed the way forestry and agriculture classes are taught. An entomology professor at Texas A&M told Douce the resources caused him to completely restructure how he teaches his classes.

According to Douce, the center website generated 9.3 million users last year and 260 million hits.

For more information, visit the website at bugwood.org.

Popular press articles

NewsLandscape Alerts give the Georgia industry current info from UGA and related university partners. On this Popular Press Articles page, we include articles of interest from  media or others outside the university community. Since these come from writers outside UGA, we cannot vouch for all the info and the views expressed do not reflect the opinion of UGA or its partners. We merely include these here for your interest.

Read morePopular press articles

Arborist info from Georgia Urban Forestry Council

This info taken from the Georgia Urban Forestry Council E-Newsletter

  • GUFC logoSpaces are still available in the January 14-15 Arborist Certification Review Class, for those planning to take the ISA Arborist Exam.  This class will be held at the Wetlands Educational Center in Richmond Hill.  Scholarship are available for tree boards and tree care workers employed by a city, county, school or university who are not ISA Certified Arborists.  Certified arborists who would like to take the class as a refresher course can receive 12.75 ISA CEUs.  For more details, visit www.gufc.org.
  • Many presentations from GUFC’s October Annual Conference, “Tree Canopy and Green Infrastructure:  Creating Vibrant and Healthy Communities,” can be founded on our website here.
  • Oregon State University (OSU) is pleased to announce the availability of two online urban forestry courses during Winter Quarter 2014 (January 6 – March 21, 2014). FES/HORT 350 Urban Forestry is an introductory undergraduate course the covers a wide range of urban forestry concepts and topics, and is suitable for anyone wanting a comprehensive understanding of the urban forestry discipline. FES/HORT 455/555 Urban Forest Planning Policy and Management is an upper level undergraduate/graduate course that offers a detailed look at the complex challenges faced by urban forestry professionals.  Read more here.
  • The Arbor Day Foundation is seeking nominations for its Arbor Day Awards Program, where they recognize outstanding individuals, environmental leaders and innovative organizations for their sustainable conservation efforts.  Learn more about  this awards program and nominate a deserving candidate here. Deadline is December 31.
  • The December 31st deadline for applying for Tree Campus USA status or for recertification is coming up soon – click here.
  • You can also apply or recertify for Tree City USA, or learn more about the program, at their portal link.
  • Also, learn more about Tree Line USA, which recognizes best practices in utility arboriculture at this site. 

Cool wet summer will probably be followed by dry winter with temperature swings

Pam Knox, Agricultural Climatologist with UGA Department of Crop and Soil Science

In the last 12 months Georgia saw the tale of drought and one of the wettest springs and summers on record. Then abnormally dry conditions returned. 2013 has been a climatic roller coaster to say the least.

Overall, the above-normal rainfall delayed planting, prevented farmers from getting into their fields and increased some fungal diseases and pests. The rain did result in lush growth, but persistent cloudiness across the state also delayed crop development once they were established.

As the rainfall diminished in the fall, abnormally dry conditions returned to some parts of the state as the growing season came to a close. This caused grazing pastures to turn brown earlier than usual.

A year for the record books

Several stations in the state accumulated noteworthy rainfalls this growing season, measured during the seven-month period from May through October.

Most notable was Macon, which had its third wettest April to October in 122 years of record keeping, with 41.71 inches. Climatologists had to go back to 1928 to find a wetter growing season. That year climatologists reported 42.89 inches during the same period.

Macon is also currently setting a record for year-to-date rainfall with 60.45 inches, ahead of the 59.88-inch record set in 1929. Macon also had its fifth coldest summer this year, due in part to the cloudiness and rainy conditions.

Atlanta experienced its fourth wettest year, in the 136 years that people have been keeping records, with 39.37 inches. The last time Atlanta received this much rain was in 2009 (40.87 inches), which included the significant flooding event of September 2009 that affected much of the Atlanta metropolitan area.

Columbus reported its fourteenth-wettest growing season in 66 years of record. However, it is interesting to note that Columbus experienced three of its five wettest growing seasons in the last decade — in 2003 (fourth), 2005 (third) and 2009 (second).

Drier times return

Despite this summers’ rains, conditions have become much drier across Georgia this fall, and abnormally dry conditions returned to a significant part of Georgia for the first time since April. The National Weather Service cooperative observer in Warrenton (Warren County) reported no precipitation in October. This was the driest October they have had in 100 years of record.

The Climate Prediction Center of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predict these drier than usual conditions will continue through the next few months. The highest chance of dry conditions is in southern Georgia, stretching south into Florida.

No El Niño or La Niña, so expect lots of fluctuation

According to NOAA, there are equal chances for above, near or below normal temperatures through the winter.

One reason this trend can be projected is the current status of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is neutral, which means that neither an El Niño nor La Niña is likely to occur this winter. These neutral ENSO conditions are expected to continue until at least next summer.

In neutral ENSO conditions, Georgia does not experience a strong trend toward above or below normal rainfall or temperature. However, the state does tend to experience large swings in temperature between warm and frigid conditions. The chance of a late frost in the spring following a neutral winter is increased, although still relatively rare.

If we experience a warm spell in early spring, gardeners and farmers are likely to want to get started planting early to take advantage of the warm conditions. However, the increased chance of a swing back to cold temperatures, and the potential for frost, should make them proceed with caution. Watch the weather carefully before starting the planting process.

For more information see November’s lows and highs are a preview of winter’s weather 

Discovery of parasitic wasp could be game changer in kudzu bug battle

Kudzu bug

See full article from the SR IPM site here

Originally published in Southeast Farm Press

By Jim Langcuster, Alabama Cooperative Extension System

Kudzu bug
Kudzu bug, Daniel R. Suiter, UGA, Bugwood.org

Within only a few days after discovering a native parasitic fly that may reduce kudzu bug numbers significantly over time, Alabama Cooperative Extension System Specialist and Auburn University Researcher Xing Ping Hu has discovered a local egg-parasitic wasp.

This finding — the first discovery of an indigent wasp that parasitizes eggs of the exotic kudzu bug — could prove to be a game changer in the fight against this invasive species, Hu says.

Along with the earlier finding of a fly that preys on kudzu bug adults, Hu says the discovery of this parasitic egg wasp doubles the frontline of defense using natural enemies to fight this exotic pest.

“This local parasitoid wasp has demonstrated a high capacity to reduce significantly the populations of kudzu bugs in soybean fields,” she says.

The discovery was made by Hu’s research assistant, Auburn University graduate student Julian Golec, during a routine investigation of kudzu bug damage in a soybean field.

Hu says kudzu bugs are no different than any other insect species introduced into a new area. Figuratively speaking, entering an area with no known local predators is like drawing a lucky lotto number: the species thrives and its numbers mushroom as it develops into a full-blown invasive species, often wreaking havoc within its new environment.

“That’s why they become invasive in the first place,” Hu says. “They have no natural enemies to balance the ecosystem.”

“It’s as if they’re saying, ‘No one can mess with me so I can do what I want.’”

On the other hand, an incoming species draws an unlucky lotto number if it enters an environment teeming with natural enemies. In such cases, the species’ numbers may spike for a few years until local predators respond to the new species.

In the case of some invasive species, such as the red imported fire ant, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has stepped in to identify predators from the invasive species’ native habitat that could be introduced to reduce their numbers.

Read the rest in Southeast Farm Press

Conversion Tables, Formulas and Suggested Guidelines for Horticultural Use

Bodie V. Pennisi, Gary L. Wade, Melvin P. Garber, Paul A. Thomas and James T. Midcap, Horticulture Department Originally prepared by S.C. Myers and A.J. Lewis, Extension Horticulturists
Measure

Formulas for calculating greenhouse volume

  • Uneven-span greenhouses
  • Quonset structures
  • Even-span greenhouses

Pesticide and fertilizer recommendations are often made on a pounds per acre and tons per acre basis. While these may be applicable to field production of many crops, orchardists, nurserymen and greenhouse operators often must convert these recommendations to smaller areas, such as row feet, square feet, or even per tree or per pot. Thus pints, cups, ounces, tablespoons and teaspoons are the common units of measure. The conversion is frequently complicated by metric units of measure. This publication is designed to aid growers in making these calculations and conversions, and also provides other data useful in the management, planning and operation of horticultural enterprises.

See the entire publication here

People and pests head indoors for the winter

Smokybrown cockroach

Editor’s note – Although this article is written for homeowners, this information may help pest control professionals to identify these occasional pests in the home. Fall is a great time to be proactive in pest management and to pest proof homes. See this publication for information on proactive pest management.

Sharon Dowdy, news editor with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.

As temperatures begin to drop, people head indoors. Unfortunately, insects like to stay warm, too, and often choose our homes as refuge. “We are getting cold snaps at night, and it triggers insects to find some place to come inside for the winter,” said Dan Suiter, a University of Georgia Extension entomologist. “They are just reacting to external conditions.”

Caulk and spray

To help keep pests from picking your home as a winter retreat, Suiter says inspect your home for openings that insects use as entryways. Seal any cracks and crevices with caulk, or fill them with steel wool.As an extra precaution, spray an insecticide around the perimeter or your home, especially to those areas on the structure where they might enter.“It’s not a bad idea to do some spot applications of insecticides. This way when the insects encounter those deposits they will be exposed to the insecticides and be killed,” Suiter said.

 

Photo credit – Asian lady beetle, W. Louis Tedders, Jr. USDA ARS SE Fruit and Tree Nut Laboratory, Byron GA and Beneficial Insectry, Oak Run, CA
Photo credit – Asian lady beetle, W. Louis Tedders, Jr. USDA ARS SE Fruit and Tree Nut Laboratory, Byron GA and Beneficial Insectry, Oak Run, CA

Lady beetles

Multicolored Asian lady beetles are the most common unwelcome house guests this time of year. In the summer months, these beetles are a welcome sight in gardens as they eat aphids, a pest of many vegetable plants and ornamental plants.

“They are great for biological control, but in the fall they start coming indoors and it’s a different story,” Suiter said.

Smokybrown Cockroaches

Smokybrown cockroach
Smokybrown cockroach, Daniel R. Suiter, UGA Entomology, Bugwood.org

Probably the most unpopular pests of homeowners is often found scurrying across kitchen floors at night – the smokybrown cockroach. Just one cockroach egg capsule holds about 15 to 18 eggs and a female lays one per week in her six-month life.

“There are peak populations this time of year. It came from Japan, and it’s been here a long time,” Suiter said. “It’s really desiccation susceptible, so it’s especially in areas where relative humidity is very high.”

Suiter said many urban pests are indicators of more severe problems.

“Usually, it’s a moisture problem. If you have a lot (of pests) in your attic, you probably have a leak,” he said.

Brown marmorated stink bug
Brown marmorated stink bug, David R. Lance, USDA APHIS PPQ, Bugwood.org

Stink bugs

Brown marmorated stink bugs also like to overwinter indoors. Native to Asia, this stink bug was first spotted in Georgia in 2010. It can be found on a wide range of host plants.

“It’s a major, major nuisance pest in the Northeast and it’s headed south,” he said. “We see them in Georgia, we just haven’t seen the numbers they have seen in the North.”

Box elder bug
Box elder bug, William M. Ciesla, Forest Health Management International, Bugwood.org

Boxelder bugs and carpet beetles

Another indoor pest, the boxelder bug, can be found on maple trees, too. Ironically, when you kill boxelder bugs, you will likely end up with a secondary pest – carpet beetles, Suiter said.

“If you kill them inside you can end up with carpet beetles. They feed on dead boxelder bugs and their populations can be enormous,” he said.

Sugarcane beetle
Sugarcane beetle, Clemson University Coop Extension Slide Series, Bugwood.org

Sugar cane beetles

Sugar cane beetles may not come inside homes, but they will chew on the outside. They are a late summer invader that shows up in large populations and feeds on grasses. “It’s a scarab beetle, and when it emerges it’s attracted to lights on houses,” he said. “They have really strong hind legs and can chew through siding.”

Chinch bugs 

Chinch bugs
Chinch bugs, David Shetlar, Ohio State University, Bugwood.org

Chinch bugs are fall pests that also feed on grasses. They are about a half-inch long and show up by the thousands. “They may not come indoors, but they like to crawl under siding,” Suiter said.

When selecting a treatment method for these pests, Suiter warns homeowners not to purchase ultrasound devices.“They have been researched by multiple research facilities, and there’s a lot of data to show they don’t work,” he said.For more on controlling household pests, see the UGA Extension publication Management of Pest Insects In and Around the Home. This publication has information on identifying insects, preventing pest problems and other control methods.

 

Discount Available for Armitage’s Sun Perennials Online Class


Armitage’s Herbaceous Perennials for the Sun
, a self-paced, self-study online certificate program from the University of Georgia, is authored by Dr. Allan Armitage, one of the world’s leading experts on perennials.

Why you’ll love this course:
FocusedThe course delivers Dr. Armitage’s insights on how to plant, propagate, and care for 20 of his favorite perennials. You’ll learn to identify the various species within the plant’s genus.
EngagingYou’ll benefit from Dr. Armitage’s extensive career in horticulture. In audio clips, the witty lecturer and researcher describes each plant’s origin, characteristics, bloom time, flower structure, and optimum growing conditions.
ConvenientThe course is online, so you can progress at your own pace, on your own schedule.
DefinitiveThe course’s required textbook, written by Armitage, is renowned in the horticultural world. With more than 1,000 pages, the book is packed with extensive plant descriptions and accompanying photographs, so you’ll use it over and over long after you complete the course!

 

Dr. Armitage and UGA have a gift for you this holiday season: $110 off the standard rate for the course! To take advantage of the $139 special rate, register between November 11 and January 24. Tip: At this low price, the course makes a great holiday gift for a friend, relative or “significant other”!

What past students say about this course:

  • “A great course! Very informative and entertaining. I highly recommend it.”
    J. Weed
  • “If in-class stuff is not for you, then take this course. Online is AWESOME!”
    Brandon Siler
  • “A great course for those master gardeners and home gardeners who want a deeper knowledge of perennials. The knowledge, appreciation, and stories I gained from this course made it well worth the time I invested in it.”
    Matt Torrence

Register Now!

 

Click here for detailed information on the course, the course author, and a list of the plants you’ll study.For other professional development courses, visit UGAKeepLearning.com

Cool wet summer will probably be followed by dry winter with temperature swings

Pam Knox, Agricultural Climatologist with UGA Department of Crop and Soil Science

In the last 12 months Georgia saw the tale of drought and one of the wettest springs and summers on record. Then abnormally dry conditions returned. 2013 has been a climatic roller coaster to say the least.

Overall, the above-normal rainfall delayed planting, prevented farmers from getting into their fields and increased some fungal diseases and pests. The rain did result in lush growth, but persistent cloudiness across the state also delayed crop development once they were established.

As the rainfall diminished in the fall, abnormally dry conditions returned to some parts of the state as the growing season came to a close. This caused grazing pastures to turn brown earlier than usual.

A year for the record books

Several stations in the state accumulated noteworthy rainfalls this growing season, measured during the seven-month period from May through October.

Most notable was Macon, which had its third wettest April to October in 122 years of record keeping, with 41.71 inches. Climatologists had to go back to 1928 to find a wetter growing season. That year climatologists reported 42.89 inches during the same period.

Macon is also currently setting a record for year-to-date rainfall with 60.45 inches, ahead of the 59.88-inch record set in 1929. Macon also had its fifth coldest summer this year, due in part to the cloudiness and rainy conditions.

Atlanta experienced its fourth wettest year, in the 136 years that people have been keeping records, with 39.37 inches. The last time Atlanta received this much rain was in 2009 (40.87 inches), which included the significant flooding event of September 2009 that affected much of the Atlanta metropolitan area.

Columbus reported its fourteenth-wettest growing season in 66 years of record. However, it is interesting to note that Columbus experienced three of its five wettest growing seasons in the last decade — in 2003 (fourth), 2005 (third) and 2009 (second).

Drier times return

Despite this summers’ rains, conditions have become much drier across Georgia this fall, and abnormally dry conditions returned to a significant part of Georgia for the first time since April. The National Weather Service cooperative observer in Warrenton (Warren County) reported no precipitation in October. This was the driest October they have had in 100 years of record.

The Climate Prediction Center of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predict these drier than usual conditions will continue through the next few months. The highest chance of dry conditions is in southern Georgia, stretching south into Florida.

No El Niño or La Niña, so expect lots of fluctuation

According to NOAA, there are equal chances for above, near or below normal temperatures through the winter.

One reason this trend can be projected is the current status of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is neutral, which means that neither an El Niño nor La Niña is likely to occur this winter. These neutral ENSO conditions are expected to continue until at least next summer.

In neutral ENSO conditions, Georgia does not experience a strong trend toward above or below normal rainfall or temperature. However, the state does tend to experience large swings in temperature between warm and frigid conditions. The chance of a late frost in the spring following a neutral winter is increased, although still relatively rare.

If we experience a warm spell in early spring, gardeners and farmers are likely to want to get started planting early to take advantage of the warm conditions. However, the increased chance of a swing back to cold temperatures, and the potential for frost, should make them proceed with caution. Watch the weather carefully before starting the planting process.

For more information see November’s lows and highs are a preview of winter’s weather