Landscape Alerts & Updates

The Landscape Alert is an email newsletter sent to the Georgia landscape and turf industry providing UGA information regarding industry issues.

These issues include emerging pests, regulatory changes, upcoming training, and new information, or technologies for the industry. Coordinated by the Center, the newsletter is a collaboration of several UGA departments – Horticulture, Entomology, Plant Pathology, Crop and Soil Science, and the Warnell School of Forestry.

Readers use the information contained in the Alerts for staff training, remaining current on upcoming issues, scouting for and identifying pests, evaluating current pest control practices and improving workplace safety. Alerts help maintain communications between state and county Extension staff, researchers, the industry, and industry associations. Alerts also serve as an educational tool for County Extension Agents.

Landscape Alerts are currently sent to more than 1700 readers and feedback has been very good. In a recent survey, of those responding, 93% stated they learned something they plan to use.

For more information email ghuber@uga.edu.


 

Latest Landscape Alerts

Landscape Alerts and Updates – MAY 2017

Slime Mold on Turfgrasses

Has your lawn been slimed?  Fear not, the grayish-black sooty substance on your turfgrass is a harmless soil protozoa that has temporarily migrated onto blades and stems to produce and disperse spores.  Diagnosis: Slime Mold,  Physarum and Fuligo sp./spp.  The occurrence is prompted by spells of humid, rainy weather during spring and early summer and is typically short-lived (1-2 weeks).  Aside from temporarily hindering photosynthesis, slime molds do not parasitize or damage the turfgrass.   Slime mold can be ignored, mowed, raked, or washed off with a pressurized stream of water.

Related Articles: what-is-this-unusual-growth-on-lawns


Lawn Burweed

If you missed the window of opportunity to manage burweed in your lawn in late winter/early spring, then you may be feeling it, literally!  The seed burs are now mature and a barefoot stroll across the lawn may inflict you with some painful hitchhikers.  At this point, applying a broadleaf herbicide product may kill the weed, but will not eliminate the existing burs that have formed, so mark your calendars for burweed scouting and control next February.  If an immediate solution is needed, locate individual plants and physically remove them.  Burweed tends to colonize compacted bare areas. For large areas of infestation it may be necessary to scalp and bag the clippings with a mower to remove the burs, followed by turfgrass renovation or establishment on those areas (assuming that you have a warm-season turfgrass species such as bermudagrass, it would not be advisable to scalp a Tall Fescue lawn in May).  For more information on scouting for lawn burweed, refer to the previous post “Winter Scouting for Lawn Burweed.”

Related articles: winter-scouting-for-burweed-soliva-pterosperma


Turf Aerification

Now is the time to aerify warm-season turfgrasses.  Last year, the dry conditions persisting from August through December depleted carbohydrate reserves in warm-season turfgrasses. A delay in turfgrass green-up was common this spring and warm-season turfgrasses are poised to replenish carbohydrate reserves and restore root systems.  “If there is a year to seriously consider core aerification, this is it,” says Dr. Clint Waltz, a Cooperative Extension turfgrass specialist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.  Core aerification relieves compaction, improves air exchange and water infiltration, and stimulates deeper root growth.  Hollow-tine aerification is the preferred method, removing soil cores to a depth of 3-4 inches, and having longer-lasting benefits.  A light fertilizer application in concert with aerification can be beneficial, but heavy nitrogen applications should be avoided to allow for the replenishment of carbohydrate reserves (over-stimulating top growth depletes carbohydrates reserves).

To make sure soil pH, phosphorus and potassium levels are within recommended ranges for optimum growth, take a soil sample to your local University of Georgia Cooperative Extension office.

Read the full article on Core Aerification and find lawn care calendars for different turfgrass species at www.GeorgiaTurf.com .

Related Articles and Publications:

Turfgrass Fertility: Soil Texture, Organic Matter, Aeration, and pH (C 1058-1)


 

 

Equipment Theft Escalates

The Georgia Urban Ag Council, a professional organization representing the Georgia landscape industry, is working to find solutions to the issue of equipment theft at worksites, offices, and storage facilities. This week, an incident in Lilburn ended with gun shots fired at landscape employees who discovered perpetrators stealing equipment from the company box truck.  The Georgia Urban Ag Council has established a Twitter account titled “GA Landscape Thefts” and is compiling information, articles, and reports from owners and residents experiencing equipment theft. Armed with this data, the UAC hopes to assist law enforcement agencies, equipment manufacturers, and suppliers in determining a course of action to reduce losses.

Here are some general equipment theft prevention strategies to consider:

  1. Train employees on company procedures to deter equipment theft.  In addition, discuss what to do in the event of a theft or robbery.
  2. Take Inventory: Establish a routine of equipment inventory. Keep documentation and photo records of serial numbers, makes, and models of equipment.
  3. Parking strategy: Be strategic about where you park your vehicle on each jobsite or lunch destination. Park in well lighted locations visible to the work crew and avoid leaving equipment unattended in back lots or hidden areas that are conducive to theft. Position trailers so they aren’t easily accessed or swapped to another vehicle.
  4. Deterrents: Lock vehicles, trailers, trailer tongues, and secure equipment when unattended. Don’t leave keys in trucks or commercial mowers.
  5. Tracking Devices:  Install tracking devices on large equipment.
  6. Be Alert: Pay attention to suspicious activity.
  7. Insurance: Review your policy and ask your insurance provider about theft prevention.

Related Articles & News:
http://www.fox5atlanta.com/news/248268869-story

Aerification: Restoring Turfgrass Carbohydrate Reserves

Dr. Clint Waltz, Extension Turfgrass Specialist with the University of Georgia, reports that hot temperatures and low rainfall in the fall of 2016 likely sent warm-season turfgrasses into winter dormancy with depleted carbohydrate reserves. During “normal” circumstances warm-season turfgrasses accumulate and store carbohydrates from late summer through early fall.  Last year, non-irrigated turfgrasses likely suffered drought-induced dormancy and transitioned to winter a weakened condition.  With insufficient energy accumulated in root systems, a thin canopy and a two- to four-week delay in the green-up of warm-season grasses might be common this spring.

 

 

 

 

 

 

What can be done to improve the green-up and growth of warm-season turfgrasses this spring?

1) AERIFICATION – Core aerification in late April to mid-May.  This will improve air exchange and water infiltration to stimulate root and shoot growth.  Performing hollow-tine aerification that removes 1/2 inch diameter soil cores to a 3 or 4 inch depth is the recommended approach.

2) TIMING OF FERTILIZER – Withhold the application of nitrogen fertilizer until soil temperatures at the 4-inch depth are consistently 65 degrees and rising.  Visit www.Georgiaturf.com to find lawn calendars that include fertility recommendations for each species.  Soil temperature data from the Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring System can be found at www.Georgiaweather.net.

3) SOIL TESTING – Collect a soil sample and submit for testing to ensure that soil Ph, phosphorous, and potassium levels are within the recommended ranges for optimum growth.  Contact your local UGA Extension Agent about submitting a soils sample to the UGA Agriculture and Environmental Services Laboratory or call 1-800-ASK-UGA1.

Restoring carbohydrate reserves this spring is an important step in preparing turfgrasses for a healthy growing season.  Read the full article by Dr. Clint Waltz at www.Georgiaturf.com.

Weed Scouting in Mid-Winter

Weeds can be a major pest of lawns and recreation fields, competing for resources and sunlight while detracting from their natural beauty.

If your spring checklist includes lawn weed management, now is the time to take a closer look at the tiny mat of weed seedlings forming in mid-winter (Jan-Feb.), especially during spells of mild weather and precipitation. The winter-weed inventory is likely to include a mix of early-stage cool-season annual and perennial weeds such as chickweed, henbit, clover, annual bluegrass, burweed, and wild garlic. One advantage of mid-winter weed scouting and management is that many weeds are in the early growth stages and can be effectively controlled by herbicide treatments. In addition, warm-season turfgrasses such as bermudagrass and zoysiagrass are dormant and less susceptible to herbicide injury than during spring green up. Mid-winter is an excellent time to scout for cool-season weed species and get an early jump on management while conditions are favorable.

Below are examples of lawn weeds commonly observed in mid-winter:

Pictured above: Henbit (left), Plantain (center), Tall Fescue in bermuda (right).

POSTEMERGENCE WEED CONTROL

Selective control of broadleaf and grassy weeds in turfgrass can be an effective strategy in mid-winter using the appropriate postemergence herbicide product(s). It should be noted that during the winter months the visible effects of certain herbicides may be masked by cool weather (the weeds may be dead and not know it yet!) Mature perennial weeds such as dandelion, clover, and undesired patches of tall fescue can be effectively spot-treated during mid-winter using selective and non-selective herbicides. It is essential to select products appropriate for the particular species or turfgrass when selecting herbicides. St. Augustinegrass and Centipedegrass are particularly susceptible to certain herbicide injuries, even during the winter months. Combination products containing fertilizer and herbicides may be appropriate for weed control in cool-season turfgrass species such as Tall Fescue during the late winter. However, combination products containing nitrogen fertilizer are NOT recommended for warm-season grasses during the winter months. Applying nitrogen to dormant warm-season grasses in mid-winter does not provide benefits to the turfgrass and promotes the development of diseases such as large patch.

Remember, turfgrass and weed identification is essential to determining the appropriate herbicide product, timing, and application rate. There are no miracle products or “one size fits all” solutions to weed control. Herbicide recommendations are based on many factors including the turfgrass species, weed species, temperature range, and environmental factors. For assistance with turfgrass and weed identification, contact your local UGA Extension Agent at 1-800-ASK-UGA1.

Download the 2017 Turfgrass Pest Control Recommendations for Professionals at www.GeorgiaTurf.com for the latest information on weed management, scheduling, and pesticide information.

References:

McCullough, Patrick E. PhD, Waltz, Clint PhD, (2015). UGA Extension Bulletin (C 978). “Weed Control in Home Lawns.”

Drought Response Level 2: Outdoor Watering Information

Prolonged dry weather has prompted an elevated drought response for northwest Georgia. Effective November 17, 2016, fifty-two counties have entered a drought response level 2 and fifty-eight counties are exercising a drought response level 1.  Rainfall has been scarce since August and water conservation is the banner message.  The Georgia Water Stewardship Act of 2010 establishes certain outdoor watering protocols to conserve water during times of drought.  These rules apply to all properties served by state permitted water systems.

Highlights of Drought Response Level 1:
A drought response level 1 initiates a public information campaign to explain drought conditions and the need for water stewardship and conservation.  Normal outdoor watering should follow best management practices and is allowed between the hours of 4:30pm and 10am any day of the week.

Highlights of Drought Response Level 2:
For existing landscapes, a drought response level 2 initiates the odd/even watering schedule by address for sprinkler systems.  For even addresses (ending in zero, 2,4,6,8) watering is allowed as needed on Wednesdays and Saturdays between the hours of 4pm and 10am.  For odd addresses (ending in 1,3,5,7,9) watering is allowed as needed on Thursdays and Sundays between the hours of 4pm and 10am.  Sprinkler systems should always be properly maintained and adjusted.  Evapotranspiration is much lower during the fall and winter and minimal irrigation is needed to prevent winter desiccation using a rate of 1/2 inch precipitation per week or less during periods of dry weather.

New Landscapes:
Under all levels of drought response, a 30 day exemption period is allowed for the establishment of new landscapes. Once the establishment period has expired, drought response watering practices should be followed accordingly.

Other Allowable Exemptions:
Handwatering using a hose with an automatic shut-off nozzle
Food gardens
Hydroseeding
Drip irrigation or soaker hoses
Horticulture crops intended for sale, resale, or installation
Athletic fields, golf courses, and public recreation areas
Maintenance or calibration of an irrigation system
Water from private wells and bodies of water on property (not exceeding state withdrawal limits)
Water from an alternate source (grey water, rain water, air-conditioner condensate)
Commercial Pressure Washing

Summary:
Stay informed on the latest drought information for your area (see helpful resources and information below).  While natural precipitation is generally sufficient to prevent plant desiccation in established landscapes during fall and winter, extremely dry conditions may require supplemental watering to help mitigate plant damage. Follow responsible watering practices and properly manage irrigation systems to protect plant health while promoting a culture of water conservation in Georgia.  Register for training opportunities such as the upcoming “Irrigation Training for Landscape Professionals” at the EDGE Expo at the Gwinnett Infinite Energy Center on December 8, 2016.

For more information on proper watering practices and training opportunities, contact your local UGA Extension Agent or call 1-800-ASK-UGA1.

Helpful Resources and Information:
http://extension.uga.edu/publications/
www.GeorgiaTurf.com
www.GeorgiaWatersmart.com
https://epd.georgia.gov/water-conservation

 

Landscape Alerts share info from UGA Extension on issues of interest to the commercial landscape industry.

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