New legal residency requirement for pesticide licenses

During the last state legislative session, a house bill was passed that required all state agencies that issue licenses to verify the legal residence of the applicant. All state agencies had to comply. The following explains the process required for verifying your legal residency when applying for a pesticide license renewal with the Georgia Department of Agriculture.

The following link contains the S&V (Secure & Verifiable) affidavit that you must submit when you renew your GA Dept of Ag Commercial Pesticide License http://www.agr.georgia.gov/verification-of-lawful-presence.aspx

•             Go to the documents column on the right side of the page.

•             Click on the Affidavit link at the bottom of the column.

•             Complete the form and have it notarized. Include a copy of  the applicant’s ID.

•             Mail, fax, or e-mail the form to the Licensing Division.

This document must accompany all new private and commercial pesticide licenses as well as renewals. It is important to understand that you will only have to complete this process once. The Affidavit will be kept on file with the GDA Licensing Program.

The website also has a tutorial to lead you through the online license renewal process.

Without the Secure and Verifiable Affidavit, new licenses and license renewals cannot be processed. If you have any questions call the Licensing Division (855) 424-4367. If the Department of Agriculture can provide additional information, please let us know.

GA Department of Agriculture explains new legal residency requirement for pesticide licenses

During the last state legislative session, a house bill was passed that required all state agencies that issue licenses to verify the legal residence of the applicant. All state agencies had to comply. The following explains the process required for verifying your legal residency when applying for a pesticide license renewal with the Georgia Department of Agriculture.

The following link contains the S&V (Secure & Verifiable) affidavit that you must submit when you renew your GA Dept of Ag Commercial Pesticide License http://www.agr.georgia.gov/verification-of-lawful-presence.aspx

•  Go to the documents column on the right side of the page.

•  Click on the Affidavit link at the bottom of the column.

•  Complete the form and have it notarized. Include a copy of

    the applicant’s ID.

•  Mail, fax, or e-mail the form to the Licensing Division.

This document must accompany all new private and commercial pesticide licenses as well as renewals. It is important to understand that you will only have to complete this process once. The Affidavit will be kept on file with the GDA Licensing Program.

The website also has a tutorial to lead you through the online license renewal process.

Without the Secure and Verifiable Affidavit, new licenses and license renewals cannot be processed. If you have any questions call the Licensing Division (855) 424-4367. If the Department of Agriculture can provide additional information, please let us know.

Reminder to businesses offering mosquito control services

 If a business offers mosquito control services for a fee, then they will need at least one person to have a Category 41 (mosquito control) license. Other license categories (24 – Ornamentals & Turf, 21 – General Agriculture, etc.) are not sufficient for companies that offer mosquito control services.

For more information on obtaining a Mosquito Control license visit:

Info on the GA Dept of Ag pesticide division.

Online video helps prepare applicators to take the mosquito control applicators exam.

Information on the Georgia Dept of Agriculture Pesticide Division (800) 282-5852

Compiled July 23, 2013GDAg

Where can I order training manuals to study to take the commercial pesticide applicator exam (mosquito control, ornamentals and turf, etc.)?

If you do not already have a commercial license, you will need to take two exams – the General Standards exam and the exam specific for your field (Mosquito Control, Ornamentals & Turf, Right of Way, etc.) Find information on ordering the manuals for the general standards exam and the category exams here.

How can I register to take a commercial pesticide applicator exam?

Visit the Applicator Testing website. You will need to create an account to enter the system. The exams are given at Technical Colleges across the state.

I have a license in one category from the Pesticide Division and want a license in a second category. Do I have to take the General Standards exam again?

No, you just need to take the test for that exam. Order the manual for that category, study the manual and then register for and take the exam that is specific for that category.

Where can I find pesticide applicator recertification classes?

Visit this website. Also contact your local Extension Agent for classes. 

Where can I find information on my commercial applicator’s license (hours needed, etc), recertification classes available, etc.?

Visit this website

 

The Georgia Department of Agriculture now has a Licensing Division. There are 7 coordinators with a call center to help assist with online renewals. The coordinators are being crossed trained so that everyone is familiar with the basic licensing process for each license. Contact the Licensing Division if you have questions – 404-586-1411 or toll free 855-424-5423 or email GDAlicensing@agr.georgia.gov

For regulatory questions continue to contact the respective division.

 

Sandy Shell is one of the Licensing Coordinators for the Georgia Department of Agriculture. She recommends the Kelly Solutions website.

The following can be accessed through this website:

  • Verify credit hours for Commercial Pesticide Applicator and Structural Pest licenses
  • Find recertification courses for private and commercial licenses
  • Renew Commercial and Pesticide Contractor Licenses (Structural renewals coming very soon)
  • Apply for a new Pesticide Contractor License
  • Apply for a new RUP Dealer license
  • Secure & Verifiable documents (coming very soon)

Does Georgia have reciprocal pesticide applicator license agreements with other states?

Georgia does reciprocate with other states on certain categories. Anyone needing more information on this can call Ag Inputs – Pesticide Section at (404) 656-4958.

Turfgrass Disease Update – Gray Leaf Spot and Rust

Rust on zoysia

Alfredo Martinez, Extension Plant Pathologist

Time to scout for gray leaf spot

Gray leaf spot is a fungus disease that affects St. Augustinegrass, perennial ryegrass and tall fescue in Georgia. Hot humid summer weather and high nitrogen levels can make turf susceptible to this disease. The fungus causing the disease is Pyricularia grisea.

Read more

Lespedeza Identification and Control in Turfgrass

Lespedeza McCullough

Edited from a publication by Patrick McCullough, UGA Extension Weed Specialist

See the entire publication here

Common lespedeza (Kummerowia striata (Thunb.) Schind syn. Lespedeza striata) is a freely-branched summer annual legume that is a problem weed in lawns and other turf areas. Common lespedeza, also known as Japanese clover or annual lespedeza, has three smooth, oblong leaflets with parallel veins that are nearly perpendicular to the midvein

As common lespedeza matures, the stems harden and become woody, which is attributed to persistence and competition with turfgrasses in late summer

Flowers are pink to purple and present in the leaf axils. Other lespedeza species may also be found as weeds in turf but common lespedeza is the primary species in Georgia.

This publication gives information on

To see the entire publication click here.

Find other UGA publications here

Photo credit – Common lespedeza in a centipedegrass lawn. Photo by P. McCullough.

Cool Season Turfgrass Disease Update

Alfredo Martinez, UGA Extension Plant Pathologist

It is time to scout for Brown patch (caused by Rhizoctonia solani) and Pythium blight (caused by Pythium spp). These diseases are often the most serious diseases on cool season grasses, especially on tall fescue and ryegrass                      

Brown patch can cause a foliar blight, which results in necrotic leaves and circular brown patches up to 4-5 ft. in diameter. High soil and leaf canopy humidity, and high temperatures increase disease severity. Higher than recommended rates of nitrogen in the spring promotes disease.

Management options include:

  • Avoid nitrogen application when the disease is active
  • Avoid infrequent irrigation and allow the foliage to dry
  • Mow when grass is dry
  • Ensure proper soil pH
  • Thatch reduction and
  • Improve soil drainage.

Pythium MartinezPythium blight has the potential to quickly cause significant damage to turfgrass. The disease starts as small spots, which initially appear dark and water-soaked. Affected turfgrass dies rapidly, collapses, and appears oily and matted. White, cottony mycelia may be evident early in the morning. The disease is driven by hot-wet weather, which correlates with an increased stress on the turf. Similar environmental and cultural factors that encourage brown patch also promote Pythium. Therefore, cultural practices for control of brown patch will also help to minimize Pythium blight development. A correct diagnosis is important because Pythium control requires specific fungicides.

Several fungicides are available for each of the diseases described above. Consult the Georgia Pest Management Handbook or the Turfgrass Pest Control Recommendations for Professionals for proper fungicide selection and usage. Read the label and follow proper guidelines.

For more information on these diseases visit:

For Brown Patch

For Pythium blight

The sun perennials “crash course” for the green industry

Armitage class promotion

Perennials are easy to grow, easy to propagate, and offer gardeners a fascinating variety of colors, forms and textures.

Armitage’s Herbaceous Perennials for the Sun is a self-paced, self-study online certificate program authored by the Dr. Allan Armitage, one of the world’s leading experts on and researchers of perennials. In this professional development course, you’ll learn the characteristics, propagation methods and optimal growing conditions of 20 species of sun perennials.

The course is online, so you can progress at your own pace, on your own schedule.

The course centers on Dr. Armitage’s textbook, Herbaceous Perennial Plants: A Treatise on their Identification, Culture, and Garden Attributes. Other resources include online access to the professor’s audio clips describing each plant’s history, propagation, flower structure, identifying characteristics, and pros and cons. You’ll assess your knowledge through self-tests, interactive exercises, and end-of-lesson quizzes that provide instant feedback.

Course Date: 

Course Format: Online

Course Fee(s): 

  • $249 regular fee (US Funds)
  • $199 association and partner rate
  • $50 30-day extension (Only one extension is granted per participant.)
  • Group Discounts are available for organizations registering 5 or more participants. For additional information about group enrollments, contact Pam Bracken at +1-706-542-3537.

Prices are listed per person.

Who Should Attend: 

  • Home garden enthusiasts
  • Master Gardeners
  • Commercial landscapers
  • Nursery and garden center employees

Continuing Education Information: 

Successful graduates will earn:

  • 2.4 Continuing Education Units (CEUs) from the University of Georgia. Definition of CEU.
  • A Certificate of Program Completion from the University of Georgia

Instructor: 

This is a self-paced, self-study course. The course is authored by Dr. Allan Armitage. He is well known and highly acclaimed as a writer, speaker and researcher. He is recognized as a leader in introducing outstanding plant varieties to the industry. Before retiring from the University of Georgia, he ran the research gardens where new plant material from most of the flower breeders in the world is evaluated. The Trial Gardens at UGA are among the finest trial gardens in the nation. They are open to the public throughout the year.

For more information on Dr. Armitage view About the Course Author.

Prerequisite Courses: There are no prerequisites.

Textbooks Requirements: 

  • Required Textbook: Armitage, Allan M. Herbaceous Perennial Plants: A Treatise on their Identification, Culture, and Garden Attributes. 3rd Edition, Stipes Publishing. 2008. (ISBN 9781588747754). The required textbook must be ordered separately from your course enrollment.
  • Suggested Textbook: Armitage, Allan M. Armitage’s Garden Perennials: A Color Encyclopedia. Timber Press. 2000. (ISBN 0881924350). This textbook is not required but will be an excellent resource for your personal library.
  • Suggested Textbook Vendor: You may order these textbooks from any textbook vendor/supplier, online at this website, or at from MBSDirect at 1+1-573-446-5299 or +1-573 446-5254 or 1-800-325-3252 (U.S. only), or online.

Textbooks will be shipped independently of your online course access details, so you should allow extra time for their delivery.

Technical Requirements:

Throughout the online course you will encounter many images, maps, links to external websites, animated exercises, and audio/video clips. To take full advantage of all these features, you will need a Windows- or Macintosh-based computer with a browser and a Flash player. A fast Internet connection is highly recommended. View Technical Requirements for more details.

Downloadable Content

  1. How it Works & Learning Objectives
  2. Technical Requirements
  3. Frequently Asked Questions
  4. About the Course Author
  5. Registration Options
  6. UGA and the Continuing Education Unit (CEU)

Rose Rosette Virus – an emerging problem

Jean Williams-Woodward, UGA Plant Pathologist

Rose rosette virus is a damaging disease that is seeing an increase in occurrence across midwestern and southern states. Rose rosette has been described since the 1940s, but it wasn’t until 2011 that the causal agent was confirmed to be a virus spread by the ‘rose leaf curl’ eriophyid mite (Phyllacoptes fructiphylus).

Rose rosette disease on Knock-Out rose
Rose rosette disease on Knock-Out rose

Rose rosette virus was predominantly found in multiflora roses (Rosa multiflora) that now grow wild in many places and is considered an invasive/noxious weed. The wild multiflora roses were thought to be how the mite and virus spread into rose landscape plantings. What is causing greater concern is that the virus is now being seen in Knock-Out roses (see images). Knock-Out roses cover commercial and residential landscapes throughout the south because they are more disease resistance than other hybrid roses. The presence of the mass Knock-Out plantings provides an easy means for the mite and virus to spread from plant to plant and location to location. The increase in the amount of rose rosette showing up in Knock-Outs, which are all vegetatively propagated, has led to speculation that the virus may be spreading through nursery stock as well. This is possible, but currently I don’t have any evidence of this.

Symptoms of rose rosette virus mimic herbicide injury. In the past, we had no way of confirming the pathogen’s presence and often tried to rule out improper herbicide use. Symptoms include an increased and rapid elongation of new growth; abnormal reddish discoloration of shoots and foliage (see image above); witches broom (proliferation of new shoots); an overabundance of thorns; and deformed buds and flowers.

We are testing a molecular PCR test in the Athens clinic that can detect the virus RNA in order to confirm the disease. This test is the only way we can confirm virus infection.

If rose rosette virus is confirmed or suspected, control options are few. There is no cure for rose rosette. Roses growing near infected cultivated or wild (multiflora) roses have a high risk of infection.

To prevent infection:

  • Inspect new nursery stock for symptoms of infection.
  • Remove all multiflora roses from the area and increase plant spacing so rose plants will not touch each other to reduce mite spread.
  • If rose rosette is present, completely remove the infected plant by bagging and discarding or by burning.
  • There is some discussion on online garden forums and from rose breeders that just pruning off symptomatic canes/stems will remove the virus. There is not at present any scientific evidence that this will work. Therefore, the prudent recommendation I can give is to completely remove the infected plant.
  • A miticide can help reduce mite (and virus) spread; however, miticides labeled for spider mite control and those commonly packaged for homeowners are ineffective on eriophyid mites. If homeowners want to have their roses sprayed, then they should contact commercially licensed landscape professionals who can use (per communication with entomologist Will Hudson) Avid (or other abamectin generics), Floramite, Magus, and Forbid.

Important Information for Pesticide Applicators

Compiled by Willie Chance, UGA Center for Urban Agriculture

 Pesticide Applicator Certification 

Pesticide transport, USDA Forest Service - Region 8 - Southern Archive, Bugwood.org
Pesticide transport, USDA Forest Service – Region 8 – Southern Archive, Bugwood.org

A Commercial Pesticide Applicator’s License is required for a person who applies pesticides to the land of another person for hire, or who manages these type pesticide applications. A firm applying pesticides for hire must also have a Pesticide Contractor’s License. Both of these licenses can be obtained through the Georgia Department of Agriculture.

Pesticide applicator certification is handled by the Georgia Department of Agriculture (800) 282-5852 extension 4958, (404) 656-4958 or http://agr.georgia.gov. Commercial pesticide licensing requirements & information are found here

Commercial Pesticide Applicators must pass two exams – one covering General Standards and a second in their area of specialty. See this site to order study materials or to sign up for exams. Exams are given at selected Technical Colleges across Georgia.

Some County Extension Offices offer a pesticide license review training to prepare workers to take the commercial pesticide applicators exam for Category 24 (ornamentals and turf) and General Standards. Gwinnett County Extension in Lawrenceville (Tim Daly) and Bibb County Extension (Karol Kelly) offer exam reviews. Contact them or your local Extension Office for details. 

Local Extension Offices may have a DVD of a exam review to use as a study guide. Reviews supplement the manuals, not replace them. Applicators should make sure to study the manuals before an exam.

Structural Pest Control Applicators are licensed through a separate section of the Georgia Department of Agriculture. Find that information here.  Some of the information in this flier will not pertain to Structural Pest Control Applicators. These applicators should also visit www.gabugs.uga.edu/

Pesticide Applicator Re-certification Opportunities

Certified pesticide applicators must be recertified every five years through ongoing training. There are several ways applicators can earn re-certification credits:

This site lists GA Department of Agriculture approved recertification classes (including UGA Extension trainings)

Subscribing to UGA Extension email newsletters and social media (see below) will also alert you about training opportunities. Also contact your local Extension Office concerning local trainings and newsletters.

Pesticide Applicator Licensing and Certification information for individuals can be found here. Here you find out:

  • When does your license expire?
  • How many credit hours have you earned?
  • How many hours do you need for recertification? Recertification hours must be earned by 90 days before your license expires.

Applicators can also find online re-certification classes here (look halfway down the page) or local UGA Extension Offices (800-ASK-UGA1) can get a DVD that certified applicators watch to gain up to five hours of credit.

Structural pest control operators – visit the UGA Urban IPM website for trainings – www.gabugs.uga.edu/

Email Newsletters, Social Media, etc for Georgia Pest Management Industries

The following  Alerts are great ways to keep up with recertification trainings offered in Georgia. Each Alert has a training calendar & featured articles on current pest information from UGA.

Landscape Alerts for the landscape and turf industry are released as needed. See past issues or subscribe here or subscribe by emailing ebauske@uga.edu.

Pest Control Alerts update the structural pest management industry. See past issues or subscribe here or subscribe by emailing ebauske@uga.edu.

To find blogs, Facebook sites, Twitters, online videos, etc. from UGA that may list trainings or other pest management information visit this site.

UGA Pest Management Handbook

UGA Extension produces a Pest Management Handbook every year. The handbook has many uses for pesticide applicators. It includes:

  • Pesticide recommendations for most major pests and crops. This can include pesticide rates, recommendations on application, post harvest or re-entry intervals and other information.
  • Pesticide handling and safety information.

View the Handbook or purchase printed copies from this website. UGA Extension produces two editions – one for homeowners and one for commercial agricultural businesses (which includes landscapers, nurseries, golf courses & greenhouses.)

The Turfgrass Pest Control Recommendations for Professionals is produced annually and is available in free print copies through Extension offices or is online at www.GeorgiaTurf.com. This publication contains pest management recommendations for most turf pests and much other helpful pest management and pesticide information. The Georgia Turf website also has a host of other great turf information – www.GeorgiaTurf.com.

Pesticide Labels and MSDS Sheets

(These are not all University websites. We list these here for your convenience only. Listing a site here or omitting another site is not a recommendation or endorsement of any website)

Find Pesticide labels online! Remember; though other information is helpful – the label is the law! Always read and follow all label directions when using pesticides.

To find labels online, use a good search engine and search using the pesticide’s exact trade name and the words ‘specimen label’.

Sources for pesticide labels include:

EPA label database

Greenbook

CDMS

Chemical Manufacturers

Other sources

MSDS or Material Safety Data Sheets tell how to use a pesticide safely and give other information on the pesticide and hazards associated with using it. MSDS sheets should be made readily available to employees that could potentially be exposed to a pesticide (or other hazardous chemical). MSDS will eventually be replaced with a 16 page SDS sheet.

Find free online MSDS Sheets – See some sources above under pesticide labels. Also see this site.

MSDS Demystifier – What do all those big words mean?

Emergency Information for Pesticide Spills & Similar Issues

In a life threatening emergency – dial 911

National Poison Control Hotline – (800) 222-1222 or (404) 616-9000- 24 hours a day (for any type poisoning – not just pesticides)

Pesticide fires/large spills/emergencies/violations in Georgia – Georgia Department of Natural Resources Environmental Response Team – (800) 241-4113.

Spills on Georgia roadways – Georgia State Patrol – Dial *GSP (*477) from any mobile phone.

Large chemical and oil spills – National Response Center 24-hour Spill Reporting Hotline – (800) 424-8802

Federal EPA (Region 4) 24-hour Spill Reporting Number – (404) 562-8700

Pesticide Removal/Cleanup Public Information Line – Region 4 Emergency Response & Removal Branch (8 am – 5 pm) (800) 564-7577

Information on small spillsNational Pesticide Information Center – (800) 858-7378

Other Pesticide Information

Pesticide disposalGA Department of Agriculture – (800) 282-5852 This article may also be helpful.

Information about risks of specific pesticides

Extension Toxicology Network

Especially note the PIPS or Pesticide Information Profiles

Information about specific pesticides or other info – National Pesticide Information Center – (800) 858-7378

Online safety videos from the Center for Urban Agriculture make a great ‘rainy day’ or ‘any day’ training in English or Spanish.

Your Local UGA Extension Office!

Locate your local UGA Extension Office or call your local UGA Extension Office – 800-ASK-UGA1 (800-275-8421) from any non-mobile phone.

Weather data for locations across Georgia provided by UGA

Recent changes in the way pyrethroid insecticides can be used

Dan Suiter, UGA Entomology and Derrick Lastinger, Georgia Department of Agriculture

IPesticide application image from MS Wordn January 2013 the U.S.-E.P.A. mandated some sweeping changes in the way pyrethroid-based insecticides will be used in the home environment. These changes will impact use labels for professional pest control operators and products available to homeowners in the over-the-counter market.

Pyrethroid insecticides can be recognized because the names of most of the active ingredients end in “-thrin”. Examples of commonly used pyrethroids are bifenthrin, cypermethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, cyfluthrin, permethrin, esfenvalerate, etc. Pyrethroid products (sprays, aerosols, and granulars) are common in the professional market, and they dominate products in the over the counter (OTC) market.

Reasoning for these changes comes from emerging data demonstrating that pyrethroid insecticides applied to hard surfaces (concrete walkways and the like) end up in water, where they can easily be washed into stormwater and streams and be toxic to fish and aquatic invertebrates. Changes to labels and labeling are underway, and will continue in the near future.

A Guidance Document, prepared by the Georgia Department of Agriculture’s Structural Pest Control Section, on the interpretation of these changes can be found here. Should you have questions, please don’t hesitate to contact the Structural Pest Section at (404) 656 – 3641, and as always defer to the label.