Growing the Underappreciated Radish

If you haven’t grown radishes in your garden, you should.  They are the underappreciated cool-season vegetable and perfect for raised beds in the community or school garden.  What radishes have going for them: They mature quickly, sometimes as short as 28 days! They are nutritious – full of vitamin C, … Read more

Plant Cool-Season Vegetables Now – a Guest Post by Paul Pugliese

Since we have had ample rainfall and moderate temperatures in Georgia, it is the perfect time to think about cool-season food gardening.  We are fortunate enough to have Paul Pugliese of UGA Extension give us some tips!  Paul writes…. Late January and early February are great times to plant cool-season … Read more

Orange Bulldog Pumpkins to the Rescue

Do you want to grow beautiful orange pumpkins for Halloween?  But, after years of seeing your crop succumb to disease you have become discouraged.  And, after learning that most of the pumpkins you see for sale at church pumpkin patches are grown in New Mexico (think LOW humidity), you have … Read more

October Chores for Your Georgia Garden

The checklist for October gardening chores according to UGA’s Vegetable Garden Calendar: October Garden Chores Choose the mild weather during this period to plant or transplant the following: beets, broccoli, cabbage, carrots, collards, lettuce, mustard, onions, radishes, spinach and turnips. Plant your second planting of fall crops such as collards, … Read more

The Importance of Soil Temperatures in Your Garden

It is the time of year when Georgia gardeners think about their Fall, cool-season gardens.   Leafy greens like spinach, leaf lettuce, and kale are all popular cool-season crops.  They don’t require the time necessary to make a “head”, you can eat the thinnings, and the varieties available are endless. … Read more

Planning Your Georgia Fall Garden

Although we are in the middle of a hot summer it is time to think about your fall garden.   We have put together a list of “tried and true” cultivars of cool-season vegetables.  These recommendations come from UGA’s Vegetable Planting Chart.  The transplants or seeds should be easy to find at your local feed-and-seed store or easy to order from seed catalogs.

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